Children's Homes

Read about one of our children’s homes by selecting the home/tab below.

Ebenezer Grace Children's Home

Ebenezer Grace Children’s Home (EGCH) was the first of the Ebenezer homes, opening it’s doors in 2010 with one child. There have been many changes since then. Year-by-year the number of children, staff, and ministry continue to grow—often more than 40 children.

These children come from various backgrounds, tribes, and subcultures. Some are counted as “cursed” acoording to tribal conditions—even condemned to a death sentence. Others were abandoned as infants. Regardless of what their history, we believe that God gave each value and has a future for each child. We are thankful that for however long they remain with us, that we have the opportunity to be a part of their story, and for them to become part of our family.

Lantu's Home of Hidden Treasures

Lantu’s Home of Hidden Treasures (Lantu’s Home) opened in October 2015. As with the beginnings of any ministry, it was birthed in the hearts of others long before the first child arrived. For Argaw and Rachel Ayele, the impression of Lantu’s (EGCH’s first child) life and death left a burden for future ministry. They had a heart to help others—like Lantu—with disabilities and special needs. Meanwhile in Florida, Suzanne Scheuble, had a passion and vision to be a part of a children’s home serving both those with special needs and typically developing children. The two ideas intersected as a collaborative effort to reach a segment of the culture—with the love of Jesus—that was negelected and devalued.

On the walls of the children’s home are the words: “For with God nothing shall be impossible”. Our desire is—with God’s help—to demonstrate that truth by impacting these lives. Whether they arrive as newborns abandoned locally, are typically developing infants and toddlers, or are children with moderate to severe special needs—each has a God-given value.

“There was a set of twins whose mother had died during childbirth, a girl with cerebral palsy who couldn’t quite meet your gaze, but she smiled, and not just a little smile but a big wide grin, when I ran my fingers through her hair and rubbed her head. These babies and special needs kiddos are cared for by sweet, amazing women who the team calls mamas. They gently and patiently feed the children, change them, bathe them, lay them down for naps, and shower them with love. It was hard to leave Lantu’s house, I was the last one out.”

—Caroline Chase (visited Lantu’s Home in February 2016)

House of Hope

We first met the children of House of Hope in late 2013. Each of the six children—most of which are orphans—are all living with HIV. When we visited them their home felt more like a hospice home for those facing impending death. Our desire was to practically assist with their care, and spiritually give them hope in Jesus.

We would later name them the House of Hope kids. We hope that in the midst of what can be physical hopelessness they will find the living and true hope. In Spring 2017, our desire to have them come under the Ebenezer family was fulfilled. Unique to our other homes, House of Hope has house parents (also HIV positive) that care for the children’s medical and practical needs, while we collectively care for them spiritually.